Jackie-Bichon (Bichon Frise x Jack Russell Terrier Mix): All You Need to Know

Bichon World is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. This post may also contain other affiliate links and Bichon World might be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on them.

Jackie-Bichon (Bichon Frise x Jack Russell Terrier Mix)The bichon frise Jack Rusell terrier crossbreed, or Jackie-bichon, is a feisty but dedicated designer breed. The Jackie-bichon, also called the jack-chon, has the heart of a lion with a giant personality to match. These may be much more tenacious and active dogs than your typical bichon frise crossbreed.

Nevertheless, this mixed breed can be a lively and hilarious addition to the home if you find one.

Jackie-Bichon (Bichon Frise x Jack Russell Terrier Mix) History

As a mixed breed, sometimes called a “hybrid,” there is little recorded history of the Jackie-bichon.

The term “hybrid” is misleading since hybrids are when two different species are crossed, such as wolf and dog. But since Jack Russell terriers and bichons frises are both dogs, they are simply mixed breed dogs. If breeders are breeding these gorgeous deliberately, they can also be called a “designer breed.”

But since this designer pup is quite rare, to understand them, we need to look at the history of its parent breeds.

A Jackie-Bichon

Jack Russell Terrier

Jack Russell TerrierThe Jack Russell terrier was first bred by a man whose name was—you guessed it—Jack Russell. As a fox hunting enthusiast, he wanted a dog to slip down fox holes with great speed and agility. This dog also needed to be fearless, even when faced with a bigger predator and relentless.

They originally came from working fox terriers and were bred to be flexible and quick, with the preferred trademark white and tan coat. This made them excellent hunters with no sense of their own size.

Today, they are lively and alert pets who typically become highly devoted to one owner. But their tenacity and energy levels can make them a bit of a handful for anybody who doesn’t give them an outlet.

Bichon Frise

Bichon FriseThe bichon frise is an ancient breed that can trace its lineage back for centuries. Their ancestors are early water hunting dogs like the early poodle or barbet but have been kept as companions for much longer.

The bichon frise only began to separate from other bichon breeds like the Maltese, Havanese, or Bolognese, when a few dogs found themselves on the Canary Islands. There, the Spanish sailors adored them as little sailing partners. Eventually, they found their way to the French court and became popular among the nobility.

They would spend some time as circus dogs due to their charismatic personalities and trainability. However, they eventually settled into their destined role as popular and ideal companion dogs in the 18th century.

Jackie-Bichon Appearance, Coat, Size, and Weight

Mixed breed dog appearance varies according to how many generations have been bred. So the first generation, or F1, will have Jackie-bichon puppies that can look quite different from each other even within the same litter. The puppies will look more uniform if two Jack-chons are bred together, creating an F2 generation.

Assuming the Jackie-bichon is a first generation pup with a Jack Russell parent and a bichon frise parent, it would be a small dog. It should have dark round eyes, a short refined nose, and folding ears that make little triangles framing its face.

Their coats will be short-to-medium length. Most puppies will have soft, single coats that curl, although a few may be born with the dense double coat of the bichon frise. Many Jackie-bichons are also born with thin coats that have long guard hairs. This gives them the look of a wire-haired terrier.

They may be white, tan, or buff, but most should be bi-color with patches of tan on their white coats.

In general, they are small but sturdy dogs with broad chests. Their short legs might be deceptive, as they can be pretty athletic. The jack-chon should also have an alert and outgoing expression.

The Jackie-bichon should weigh between 10 and 20 pounds and typically stands between 10 and 14 inches as an adult.

Jackie-Bichon Maintenance Requirements

The jack-chon should not require too much coat maintenance unless they were born with a thick, dense coat; brushing two to three times a week should be fine. This is to remove dead hair and avoid matting that can cause infections and irritation. They will only need a bath about once a month, but the occasional visit to the doggy parlor won’t go amiss to keep their coat in the best condition.

They may be shedders, and most Jackie-bichons will not be hypoallergenic. So, this is not the dog for anybody with allergies. Small hair will most likely be on the furniture, so be prepared with a lint roller.

Their ears may be susceptible to ear infections, so have a groomer or vet show you how to clean their ears. It’s essential to know how to remove wax from the outside without pushing it deeper into the canal.

Likewise, overgrown nails can cause pain in their paws as their toes are unnaturally pushed upward. This affects the bones and tendons in their feet. Learning to trim the nails correctly once a month is part of your Jack-Russell terrier bichon frise cross breed’s essential care needs.

Finally, don’t forget those teeth! Small dogs are especially prone to dental disease, and this inflammation and bacteria build-up can cause other health problems. Severe conditions such as heart problems and diabetes are linked to bad teeth, so make sure to start a regular teeth maintenance schedule.

Jackie-Bichon Exercise and Space Requirements

The Jackie-bichon will be a fairly active dog that loves to run, especially while young. They can adapt to small spaces, but they are not always ideal apartment dogs, especially if you are away for long hours.

The bichon part of this dog can lead them to be very attached to their owner, and the terrier energy and tenacity added to this can make for a potent cocktail. They are inclined to excessive barking or destructive behaviors if they do not get adequate exercise. This means they may only adapt to apartments if you are home most of the time and up for loads of walks and playtime.

The Jackie-chon should be walked between 30 and 45 minutes per day. However, this may not be enough for these little busybodies. Additional high-intensity playtime such as fetch will help their moods and keep them settled. There should be a good balance of structured exercise on the leash, walking or short jogs, and unstructured exercise such as playing fetch.

Joining fun activities like agility or earth dog trials can be a great way to bond with your Jackie-bichon and let them burn off steam at the same time.

Jackie-Bichon Temperament and Intelligence

The Jackie-bichon is likely to be a confident, assertive, and alert dog dedicated to their family. This little fellow may be small, but they can well decide to be the valiant protectors and guardians of their humans and their home. This can make them hypervigilant about strangers, so early socialization is important.

They are also fearless, with a strong prey drive, so they are best kept away from any hamsters. They should be taught how to interact with other dogs during the critical socialization window. This is because the adult, unsocialized Jackie-bichon may well challenge a Rottweiler to a duel in the dog park.

They get along fine with cats so long as they are raised with them. However, they may chase strange cats away.

In general, the jack-chon also has a sweet side. They love cuddles and spending time with their family, but they will love a good romp and playtime just as much. They may grow deeply attached to one person in the household, in particular. If raised correctly, these are also very sociable dogs and will enjoy playing with older children or living with an active family.

While very intelligent, the Jackie-bichon is not necessarily the most trainable. They are quick-witted, but they are also independent and easily distracted. Training sessions will need to be kept short and consistent. You will need a bit of patience and be ready with loads of positive reinforcement. Remember, these dogs love attention!

Also, don’t overlook good obedience training just because you have a small dog. Having a dog who comes when called or sits when told to can literally be a lifesaver. For instance, as in the case of a dog running into a road. Even if this breed is harder to train, consistent, reliable training is just as important for them as school is for children.

Jackie-Bichon Health and Lifespan

The average Jack Russell terrier Bichon Frise mix breed should live between 11 and 16 years. These are fairly healthy dogs who can live well into their late teens with proper care.

Even though crossbreeds are theoretically healthier than purebreds because of their broader gene pool, they can still inherit some diseases from their parents. Problems to watch out for include:

  • Diabetes
  • Cushing’s disease
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Patellar luxation
  • Cataracts and eye health issues
  • Liver problems
  • Legg-Perthes disease

To help the Jackie-chon it is vital to manage their nutrition and exercise. These dogs are given to being overweight, which can severely impact their health and cause other issues. Make sure your dog is eating the correct diet for its age and size. You can also go for regular diets to make sure there are no underlying problems.

Issues with the liver, for instance, or diabetes, are conditions that need specially formulated diets. If your Jackie-chon is healthy, look for quality formulas for small breeds. Do not feed adult food to puppies, and after they are 10 years old, make sure they move to food for seniors.

If your dog has no allergies, look for quality animal proteins on the label, with a crude protein percentage between 25 and 30%. After your puppy is grown, reduce the fat content in the food to no more than 15% for long-term health. Avoid any artificial preservatives, colors, or flavors.

Is Jackie-Bichon the Right Breed for You?

The bichon frise Jack Russell mixed breed might be the right dog for you if:

  • You love the bichon frise but want a dog with lower grooming requirements.
  • Your space is limited. Keep in mind that how well a Jackie-bichon adjusts to an apartment can depend on how much they take after the Jack Russell. If they are in a small space, they will need more going for walks or playing.
  • Neither you nor anybody in your household has dog allergies.
  • You don’t mind a little shedding.
  • You or somebody else in the household are at home for most of the day.
  • You have the time to train your puppy from an early age and invest in a good socialization puppy school.
  • Any children in the household are old enough to be left around a small puppy. The exact age that a child can safely carry a small puppy without an accident might vary from child to child.
  • You love the friendliness of the bichon but enjoy the feistiness of a terrier.
  • You have adequate time to walk and play with this dog every day.

Summary

The Jackie-bichon is an active and lively little dog that makes a great pet for those happy to spend a little extra time walking and playing. They are great companions but could be a bit feisty and tenacious. These are confident and outgoing dogs, and so they should be well socialized and taught obedience early. They are alert and make great little watchdogs, but a bored Jackie-chon may start barking and bothering your neighbors.

However, if they are well-trained and given a good outlet for energy, these are not high-maintenance dogs. They do fine with regular brushing and routine maintenance and make good family members.