Goldichon (Bichon Frise x Golden Retriever Mix): All You Need to Know

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Goldichon (Bichon Frise x Golden Retriever Mix)The goldichon is both beauty and amiability brought to life in one adorable package. This designer dog breed results from mixing the popular golden retriever with the companion-sized bichon frise. It may not seem possible to combine two such vastly different-sized dogs, but it’s the perfect blend.

Think of all the desirable traits of a golden retriever that make them the quintessential family dog, all in a pint-sized version. Below, we have covered all you need to know about this bichon frise mixed breed to help you know whether it is the right one for you.

Goldichon (Golden Retriever x Bichon Frise Mix): History

Bichon FriseMixing two desirable dog breeds to get one dreamy pooch is a fairly recent practice that’s a part of designer breeding. Unfortunately, little is known about whose genius idea it was to come up with the adorable goldichon.

The goldichon first became established in the USA as designer dog breeds rose in popularity in the past few decades but is still extremely rare. They are not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) as they are still considered a mixed breed.

Breeders who breed a purebred golden retriever with a bichon frise create a first-generation (F1) mix. If two goldichons are bred together, they become F2 generation, and so forth. True goldichon breeders will try to breed multigenerational dogs to get a standardized set of traits and characteristics.

A goldichon goes by other names such as:

  • Golden bichon
  • Golden frise
  • Golden retriever bichon frise mix

Goldichon Appearance, Coat, Size, and Weight

Golden RetrieverDespite their golden retriever ancestry, goldichons’ sizes typically range on the smaller end. Both males and females stand around 15 to 20 inches at the shoulders and weigh approximately 20 to 40 pounds. Most golden frises attain this adult height at the age of 8 to 12 months. Goldichon puppies are especially vulnerable to injury, so be sure to supervise interactions with small children or much bigger dogs.

As a mixed breed dog, the goldichon’s appearance can vary widely. The golden retriever can carry the dominant gene, in which case the goldichon will look more like a goldie. Alternatively, the bichon frise can pass down most of the physical attributes.  It’s a wide spectrum and F1 and F2 generation goldichons can fit anywhere on it while the F3 and F4 generations should have a more reliable look.

But typically, the golden bichon has a soft, wavy, short-to-medium coat that can tangle pretty fast without regular brushing. As a bichon frise descendant, the goldichon could have a double coat, so when the inner coat sheds, hair can get caught up in the topcoat leading to matting.

Goldichons can come in cream, red, or golden color.  They often have shorter legs compared to the rest of their body. This is especially true if the goldichon inherits a torso size close to that of the golden retriever. They often look like smaller, fluffier, golden retrievers.

While the bichon frise is hypoallergenic, the golden retriever is not, so the goldichon may not be ideal for allergy sufferers.

Goldichon Maintenance, Activity, and Space Requirements

Maintenance requirements are an essential factor to consider anytime you want to choose a pet companion. Luckily, goldichons have moderate maintenance requirements and are a good choice for new owners.

Grooming Requirements

Goldichons generally don’t shed as much as their golden retriever parents. If you are looking for a low-shedding dog, they’re a good pick. They need regular brushing to keep the coat shiny and free of matting. Brushing at least two times a week is advisable, or up to four times a week if they have longer and fluffier coats. Brushing helps distribute the natural oils in their skin to keep their coat healthy and shiny.

One of the parent breeds, the bichon frise, is prone to tearing and this means the goldichon can have issues with tear stains too. For this reason, a regular hygiene routine around the eye area is absolutely crucial to avoid tear stains and gunk under the eyes. Simply use a damp cloth to wipe off any tears from your pup’s eyes, and you will be good to go.

The goldichon can have lots of hair on their face. Excessive face hair can blur good vision for your dog and is generally quite uncomfortable. Trim face hair every once in a while whenever you can tell that it has grown too long.

Goldichon’s nails should be trimmed every 3 to 4 weeks or as often as needed to keep the nails from touching the ground when your dog is standing. A good rule of thumb is to trim the nails as soon as you hear clicking sounds when your dog is walking on a hard floor.

These are not dirty dogs, and you don’t have to worry about random foul smells from your canine best friend. Bathing your golden frise once a month or every other month is sufficient. If your pup gets dirty mid-month, feel free to wash him up for a smooth and healthy coat.  But beware that excessive bathing can strip their coat of natural oils.

Brushing the teeth at least twice a week is important to keep your dog’s mouth clean and healthy. The goldichon is a small breed and as such, prone to dental issues. They are susceptible to dental problems such as canine periodontitis, which can lead to other health issues.

Activity Requirements

These are relatively active dogs that need about 45 minutes of moderate exercise a day.  Whether going for a walk or playing fetch, keeping active is vital for their wellbeing.

Bottled-up energy will lead to unwanted behaviors like chewing up your furniture and with their golden retriever parent, goldichons thrive on activities.  They will love playdates with other dogs, and mentally stimulating ways to spend their time such as obedience training or agility. They are also smart and eager to please, so make for great service and therapy dogs.

Space Requirements

The goldichon is highly adaptable because of its small size. Moderate energy requirements also make this mixed breed suitable for smaller living spaces, although they will enjoy a yard. Unlike their golden retriever parents, who need plenty of room to stretch their feet, goldichons are a perfect choice for apartment dwellers.

Goldichon Temperament and Intelligence

Goldichons are highly desirable pups, not just because they are incredibly gorgeous but are loyal and affectionate. They take after their golden retriever parents and are super mellow. After random bursts of energy, goldichons are perfectly content hanging out with you, making perfect lap dogs like the bichon frise.

They are very sociable and get along with everyone and everything. They do this so well that they may forget their small size when around young children, possibly resulting in injuries. For this reason, be careful whenever a child is playing with your goldichon to keep him from getting hurt unintentionally.

Goldichons are usually great with other pets and animals. Because of just how loving they are, you would do well to have playmates for them such as other dogs. On top of that, their low prey drive makes them suitable to be around small animals such as hamsters and bunnies.

It’s worth noting that goldichons didn’t leave behind their bichon frise lineage. It is not the best day for these pups when their owners aren’t around because they can develop separation anxiety. Pups with social anxiety indulge in behaviors like chewing on furniture. Other than that, they are just happy, extroverted pups bound to wriggle into the hardest of hearts.

Even if all you want is to shower your beloved pooch with love, it is important not to shelter them from the world. Doing so could lead to improper socialization and excessive emotional dependence on the owner, which can be extremely stressful to the dog. Early socialization and training are vital for a well-adjusted golden frise.

Intelligence

Having intelligent breeds as parents, goldichons rank high on the intelligence scale.

It is quite easy to train these pups because, being golden retriever descendants, they are eager to please. Their bichon frise lineage makes them extra devoted to their owners. If your goldichon took after the bichon frise, he may have more of an independence streak but will still take to learning easily with positive reinforcement.

Goldichon Health and Lifespan

Goldichons live for 12 to 15 years and typically have a healthy life but there are a few diseases that they may be predisposed to. These conditions are mostly seen in their parent breeds. Some of them include:

  • Progressive retinal atrophy: These degenerative diseases wreak havoc on photoreceptor cells which could lead to blindness over time
  • Hip dysplasia: This hip deformity happens during growth In this condition, growth of the pelvis head and the socket in the pelvis doesn’t happen at equal speeds during puppyhood
  • Cancer: The golden retriever, a parent breed of the goldichon, is known to be prone to getting cancer. This likelihood could, unfortunately, be passed down to the golden frise.
  • Dental problems: As a small breed, the goldichon’s teeth are crowded in the mouth. For this reason, dental issues are likely to come up, making it important to brush their teeth often.

3 Goldichon Fun Facts

To give you a better idea of what goldichons are like, below are three fun facts:

#1: The Gentlest Mouths

The golden retriever was bred to retrieve fowls in Scotland where they learned to hold objects so gently that some can even hold an egg without cracking it. This trait is sometimes passed down to the goldichon and their soft mouths are excellent in case your hand accidentally ends up in one.

#2: Not a Big Barker

The goldichon is a descendant of two mellow dogs. As a result, they have a gentle disposition and only want to please you. This mixed breed dog will only bark to catch your attention every once in a while. This makes them suitable for people who love dogs but just can’t handle excessive barking.

#3: A Horrible Watchdog

They are the perfect pet companions but would make horrible watchdogs. They are just too nice for that job and would probably play with an intruder instead of alerting you. Watchdogs need to be suspicious of new faces and goldichons tend to love everybody.

Is Goldichon the Right Breed for You?

The answer to that question, of course, depends on a variety of factors. In general, you should get a goldichon if:

  • You are home a lot of the time: Due to the bichon frise lineage, goldichons can develop serious separation anxiety. This results in deep feelings of anxiety in your dog when left alone for long periods. To avoid this emotional discomfort and behavior problems, it’s best if somebody is home most of the day and they are not left alone for long periods.
  • You live in an apartment or have limited space: As small dogs, goldichons are suitable for owners who live in apartments. Large breeds need plenty of space to move about to channel their energy. Bottled-up energy is a recipe for disaster so expect chewed furniture and shoes if your dog is understimulated.
  • You don’t have an active lifestyle: With only moderate exercise requirements, goldichons are convenient for people who are up for a good long walk, rather than an hour’s run. A daily walk and a few minutes of playtime and training are sufficient for this little champ to prevent boredom by promoting mental stimulation.

Summary

The goldichon is an ideal choice for a pet companion and is suited to newbie dog owners.  These are good family dogs, as well as great companions for single adults who are retired or work from home. They have moderate grooming and exercise needs and can adapt to smaller spaces.